How Do You Measure Progress: Camp NaNoWriMo Week 1

I had entered Camp NaNoWriMo with a goal of editing my current work in progress for a total of 30 hours in the month. After the first two hours, I realized my word count had increased only by about 100 words.

In the editing phase, a low change in word count is not a problem. You’re switching out weak verbs for stronger ones, restructuring confusing sentences, and taking out filler words and sentences. You’re exchanging more words than adding new ones. If I were at the editing phase for the entire novel, I wouldn’t mind having little to show as far as my changes in word count went.

However, there are still huge chunks of the story that I haven’t written. I entered July with 57,009 words written for Volume 3. I anticipate this story ending up around 65-70k. The beginning chapters are stronger, because I start at the beginning of the story when I start a new round of revision before losing the energy to think of ways to fill those plot holes. So, I’ve changed my goal for Camp NaNoWriMo to use this month to fill in those holes and complete the stories for Volumes 3, 4, and 5. I aim to add 25,000 new words total for these three novels.

I had a slow start for Week 1, with changing my goal, writing the two final project papers for my classes, and celebrating Independence Day. I have a total of about 700 words written, with 24,300 to go.

I often use the terms editing and revising interchangeably, but that’s only because in any one in-progress novel, I’m at the editing phase in some places and the revising phase in others. (And the drafting phase in a few, which is what I’m hoping to change this month.) These are the steps to my writing process:

  1. Planning.¬†I need to know where the story is going before I begin writing, but even if I manage to write out a sentence description for each chapter, it is still not enough for some parts of the story and I flounder a bit. When going into a challege like NaNoWriMo, I need to know at the minimum my main characters, the setting, how the story begins, what the characters want, and how the story ends. I’m afraid to spend too much time planning, though, in case I never get around to writing the novel or lose interest in it.
  2. Drafting. Also known as writing. This is the part where I actually write the story. I’m a “bare-bones” writer, which means I usually have to go back in subsequent drafts and add in details and whole scenes. If I’m not sure how to get the characters from one plot point to another, I’ll often skip ahead to the scene after that, although I try to write in order as much as possible.
  3. Revising. The version of the story I write in the drafting step is my first draft. I’ll go through 6 or more drafts of revising. This is the step where I go back and fill in the plot holes. I cut scenes that aren’t necessary. I move events around. I begin new drafts in the revision process when I’ve set myself a challenge to see how much I can get done in a certain time period (like Camp NaNo), or I have to make a huge change and want to keep a copy of the previous draft before that change was made.
  4. Editing. This step is more detail-oriented than revision. This is where I’m fixing up sentences, adding in description, and basically making things pretty. If revision is amount changing paragraphs, editing is about changing words.
  5. Proofreading. Checking for typos. This is my favorite phase because it means most of the work is done. This phase gives me one more chance not only to find any errors, but to add or take out anything before someone else reads my work. The novel is done but not done.

The hardest part about writing is that so much of a story lives in a writer’s head, and it’s hard to translate it into words that will conjure up the same images and feelings for someone else. Sometimes I’m so afraid of writing something “wrong,” something that doesn’t match what I’m imagining, that I avoid writing it. That’s how I came to be on draft 8 of Volume 3 and still have so many missing scenes.

Does anyone else often find themselves at different phases of the process within one manuscript? How do you measure your progress when editing or revising–by words, by chapters, by hours, or something else?