Vacation

Yesterday, I returned home from a 9-day vacation. I had some homework I had to do for the online classes I’m taking for my master’s degree, but other than that, I let my mind take a vacation from any kind of creative effort. Besides the typical vacation activities of sight-seeing and eating out at too many restaurants, I did more reading than I’d done in the last several weeks. I’m not sure if it was the change of scenery or the reading, but this vacation was exactly what I needed for my writing.

I had hoped to write every day in August as part of my handwriting and short story writing challenges, but I didn’t even have a chance to think about what type of short stories I want to write this month. As I took a deliberate step away from the story world I’d been working on for the last four years, my characters and the plot caught up with me when I least expected it. I had one of those major breakthroughs that made me excited to work on the story again.

The timeline of the series was holding me back. Fixing it requires a lot of work, but it’s going to make everything better. When I was freed from my own setting, I learned not to consider my books’ settings as set in stone. Since they’re still works in progress, the settings exist only in my mind, and I can change whatever I want about them. I’m giving more thought to the living arrangements of the characters and where and how they spend the majority of their time. I don’t need to rush them from one scene to the next.

I love to travel and I’d recommend vacation to everyone, writer or not, but I realize it’s not feasible for most people to take long trips. If I hadn’t taken half the days as unpaid, this one trip would have used up all my vacation time from work for the next year. If you can’t put yourself in new surroundings physically, immerse yourself in a book.

Reading is its own kind of magic. Two people could read the same scene and picture the room or the atmosphere or the characters differently. The author has done most of the work, but you still bring the story to life in your mind when you read. I always have several books in progress at a time. I would read a chapter or two, and even if I was still interested in the book and excited to read it, something new would come along and I would abandon the older book for a while. One of the books I finished on this trip was one I started reading in April. I’d averaged about a chapter a week until I spent some uninterrupted time with it. I traveled deeper into the universe of the book by focusing longer stretches of uninterrupted time with it. I connected more to the story than I would have otherwise.

Now that I’ve returned home to my usual distractions, it’s going to take some effort to maintain that kind of concentration, but I’m determined. I’d forgotten how much fun it is to be obsessed with whatever book I was currently reading and want to return to it. It’s been an even longer time since I felt like that about my writing, but I hope that once I get back into it, I’ll find that joy again. I’m seriously considering rewriting the whole series. I had rejected that idea months ago because I’ve already put so much work into it, but I want it to be my best work. All these previous drafts are practice, and they all taught me something in the process.

My next step, whether I start over or continue trying to add in missing scenes, is to write out all the major plot points on index cards. My goals for the next week are to have Volume 1 plotted out on cards and to write 5,000 words for a short story. I’ll see you in a week with an update!