August Handwriting Challenge Update

I challenged myself this month to do all my writing and editing on paper rather than the computer. On top of that challenge, I also wanted to write one or more short stories. While I’ve been busy with homework and haven’t written quite as much as I’d hoped to this last week, I did write 7 pages, front and back. I haven’t counted the words, but I think it’s between 2,500 and 3,000 words. I definitely write slower by hand than I do on the computer, but now that I’m not thinking about this in terms of trying to handwrite an entire 50,000-word novel in a month, it might not be an issue. Here are a few things I’ve learned so far in my experiment.

Use a separate notebook for each story. My notebook of choice had been a 5-subject, 8 by 11 inch, 200-page Mead Five Star notebook. Using these for mostly notes and only the occasional draft of a scene, one notebook would last me about two years before it was filled. I started one story in my current notebook, and after I’d written a few pages, I wished I’d used a separate notebook so the story wouldn’t get lost amidst all the unrelated notes.

Leave some blank pages for notes. On the second story I began last week, I started writing it in a new, smaller notebook, and I began on the sixth page, leaving the first five pages for notes, such as where I want to pick up when I sit down to write the next day, names and descriptions of characters I want to introduce, and descriptions of settings. By putting the notes at the beginning, I could use the rest of the notebook for another story or another draft after the first one is finished. I like to use every page in my notebooks.

It’s okay to write only for the sake of writing. One cause of my writer’s block is the pressure I put on myself to create a finished piece of work. When a spark of a scene caught my interest, I spent an hour working on it. It doesn’t have any structure or fit into any of my larger projects, but it gave me a chance to experiment with writing first person point of view when I normally use third person. I have several books of writing prompts, but I rarely use them because none of the prompts fit into the projects I’m currently working on. Once I actually tried writing with no final project in mind, the stress was gone, and I got a lot of words down. Besides, a writing prompt might lead to a whole story if I give it enough thought.

Through various back-to-school sales over the last few years, I’ve amassed enough notebooks to last me more than 20 years, so I’m excited to put some of these to use. I plan to use either 1-subject or composition notebooks for ideas that I think might turn into complete stories, and one of my spare 5-subject notebooks for writing prompts or other writing exercises. Once I get this new notebook system figured out, I’ll write a post (with pictures) about each notebook I use and how I use them. I’m a stationery nerd and love to see everyone’s writing supplies.